Tuesday, April 12, 2005

Rafael Freyre

Another great Mexican political cartoonist who thrived in the 50's and 60's, excellent painter as well but his amazing pen & ink and luscious brush work was by far the best of his era.



Rafael Freyre





Rafael Freyre




Rafael Freyre




Rafael Freyre




Rafael Freyre






Rafael Freyre















Rafael Freyre




Rafael Freyre



Rafael Freyre






16 comments:

wcr1 said...

Hey, this guy I like. Beautiful line work, sort of a combo of Hirschfeld and Jeff Danziger, not that he consciously did so. Looks like he may have predated Danziger in any case.

Who's the little dude in the Beatles pic?

Process Junkie said...

Rafael drew his trademark frog/toad in most of his cartoons, in the Beatles pic the toad is wearing that british empire "magistrate wig" headdress thang.

He looked just like a toad in real life.

-A

The Monkeyking said...

Fantastic!
Thanks for sharing.


How's the cover coming? :)

Process Junkie said...

It's coming, I'll email you progress pics.

-A

Mike M said...

fantastico! How did you come by all of this great material/ Were you into collecting this art as a kid?

Process Junkie said...

I still have a good chunk of stuff from the time I was a teen, as with the Divito and José Luis Salinas illustrations (I'll tell you that story later :)) , the Mexican stuff comes from various books I used to own and left behind when I moved to NYC, some I managed to track down in México and some I traded with an old caricature collector friend of mine, a lot of the books are of a very low quality most were printed on newsprint and they have really taken a beating so there was a lot of curating. I'm positive Americans haven't seen a lot of this stuff, and it's a real shame because this art is really inspirational.

-A

Allan L. said...

Inspirational? I'll say! That is some incredible linework.

Eric said...

Beautiful work. It really is something, that you share this part of your past with us. I will not go into detail but aside from the joy of seeing inspiring art, it is uplifting to see this part of Mexican culture incorporated into an art that I can relate to.

- Eric

Eric said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
Process Junkie said...

I'm glad you enjoyed them Eric. Thank you all for the comments.

Much of the work of these great artists hasn't been seen in America, mainly due to its political content, things are way different now, but back then, from the 20's all through the "Cold War" and the Reagan era, cartoonists who criticized American politics were not welcomed here, Latin american artists in particular were (and continue to be) harsh critics of the US "interventional" policies towards its neighbors of the south and the rest of the world.

Some artists, such as Miguel Cobarrubias enjoyed a great deal of success in the States not necessarily because they were the best artists representing Latinos, (though certainly Miguel was one of the best) but mainly because they were docile and did not "rock the boat" sort of speak.

Take a look at Carreño's Uncle Sam apparently puppeteering Nicaraguan dictator A. Somoza, a president the US help put in power and controled at will and as soon as the shit hit the proverbial fan and the Nicaraguans started a revolution, was left hanging (pun intended) and Freyre's tiny Fidel Castro kicking the mighty Uncle Sam.


-A

Elisa said...

Thanks again for sharing these images. They're wonderful.

Jill said...

Alberto,
Just incredible. These are fantastic!! Thanks so much.

Jill

Jess said...

Hey Alberto where can i get books that have Rafael's work? Is there any?

Process Junkie said...

There are currently no books on Freyre published in the US, all these stuff came mainly from 2 mexican books I used to own, (I traded them for a beautifullly printed volume of mexican calendar art called " La Leyenda De Los Cromos" compiled and produced in 2000 by the "Museo Soumaya) I'll get more info on the books and hopefully I'll get more copies next time I visit México.

Rexus Melexis said...

Very beautiful work-I really like the caricature. Who is the drawing of the guy with the glasses. I'm not really sure who that was. How important is he to contemporary Mexican cartooning? Is his work shown in art schools south of the boarder for the most part? It looks as if he may have done some publishing stateside. All summed, a very talented artist.

Rick said...

Pick a copy up for me, Doc!